i put too much food in my belly

i am here

hello

thequeenstons:

This is one of the biggest “fuck you“‘s to completionists I’ve ever seen

allmymetaphors:

ppl always ask me “”what are you going to do with your degree”“ and “"if you wanna get a PHD how do you plan on paying for it"" and ""where are you gonna move after college"" but here is the thing:

i am very powerful and cute and im gonna float through this world one day at a time. please leave me alone. 

both my phone and laptop need constant charge to live

my portable devices are not so portable

i want you all to know that i look hella cute right now

jinoras-light:

I’m sure he’d be proud too

martinsmind:

jessepinkmanist:

life hack: if you don’t want this to happen when clicking urls

image

hold in ctrl while clicking

SPREAD THIS LIKE BUTTER ON A TOAST

londonpalestineaction:

Sainsbury’s can’t tell the difference between antisemitism and anti-apartheid: an open letter
On Saturday 16 July, the manager of a Sainsbury’s store in Holborn apparently removed kosher products, many of which were not made in Israel, from their shelves. Whether they did this because of a supposed support for Palestinians, or because of an unfounded fear of violence from protesters, is unclear.
What is clear is this: Palestinian civil society did not ask for a boycott of kosher food. Only antisemites would want or support that. The call has always been explicitly and openly about boycotting Israeli-made goods, along with other tactics, until Israel complies with international law (which it currently ignores).
These tactics worked against apartheid South Africa, and they’re starting to work against apartheid Israel too.
The way forward is simple. Sainsbury’s cannot morally profit from or work with companies like Mehadrin and EDOM that steal Palestinian land and support the siege on Gaza.
Sainsbury’s knows all of this. The flyers given out at numerous Sainsbury’s stores across the country are unequivocal. The website specifically targeting Sainsbury’s trade with complicit Israeli companies is unambiguous.
We have sent files to Sainsbury’s management making it clear how their policies are harming Palestinian people, and have taken these to the last two Sainsbury’s AGMs. Individuals have asked for meetings to work on how this harm can stop, but the offers have been repeatedly ignored.
Sainsbury’s: if you can’t tell the difference between a boycott aimed at ending the occupation of Palestinian lands, and stopping Jewish people being able to buy kosher food in the UK, then you really need our help.
Signed by, amongst others:
London Palestine Action
Annie O’Gara Sainsbury’s Campaign
Michael Deas, coordinator in Europe, Palestinian BDS National Committee
Diana Neslen, Stop G4S
Hilary Lang, Frome Friends of Palestine
Pamela Manning, Cambridge Palestine Solidarity Campaign
Shoomi Chowdhury, Ipswich and Suffolk Muslim Council
Global Citizens (GC)
Grass Roots Muslim Movement
Angus Geddes, Portsmouth & South Downs Palestine Solidarity Campaign
Caroline Day, Tower Hamlets Jenin Friendship Association
Richard Hering - visionOntv
Sue Owen, Chesterfield Pro-peace/PSC
Naeem Malik West Midlands Palestine Solidarity Campaign 
Dr. Sue Blackwell (Sainsbury’s shareholder)
brighton and Hove PSC
Revolutionary Socialism in the 21st Century (rs21.org.uk)
Azfar Shafi, University of Birmingham Students for Justice in Palestine society
Dr mohamed Ali, NHS
Paddy O’Keeffe, Brighton Stop the War
Ben Maloney - Secretary, Enfield Southgate Labour Party
Tim Holmes, Public Interest Research Centre
Igor Strapko, Clapton Ultras
Rachel O’Brien, Community Action Officer at University of Birmingham Guild of Students
John Tymon, Football Against Apartheid
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londonpalestineaction:

Sainsbury’s can’t tell the difference between antisemitism and anti-apartheid: an open letter

On Saturday 16 July, the manager of a Sainsbury’s store in Holborn apparently removed kosher products, many of which were not made in Israel, from their shelves. Whether they did this because of a supposed support for Palestinians, or because of an unfounded fear of violence from protesters, is unclear.

What is clear is this: Palestinian civil society did not ask for a boycott of kosher food. Only antisemites would want or support that. The call has always been explicitly and openly about boycotting Israeli-made goods, along with other tactics, until Israel complies with international law (which it currently ignores).

These tactics worked against apartheid South Africa, and they’re starting to work against apartheid Israel too.

The way forward is simple. Sainsbury’s cannot morally profit from or work with companies like Mehadrin and EDOM that steal Palestinian land and support the siege on Gaza.

Sainsbury’s knows all of this. The flyers given out at numerous Sainsbury’s stores across the country are unequivocal. The website specifically targeting Sainsbury’s trade with complicit Israeli companies is unambiguous.

We have sent files to Sainsbury’s management making it clear how their policies are harming Palestinian people, and have taken these to the last two Sainsbury’s AGMs. Individuals have asked for meetings to work on how this harm can stop, but the offers have been repeatedly ignored.

Sainsbury’s: if you can’t tell the difference between a boycott aimed at ending the occupation of Palestinian lands, and stopping Jewish people being able to buy kosher food in the UK, then you really need our help.

Signed by, amongst others:

  • London Palestine Action
  • Annie O’Gara Sainsbury’s Campaign
  • Michael Deas, coordinator in Europe, Palestinian BDS National Committee
  • Diana Neslen, Stop G4S
  • Hilary Lang, Frome Friends of Palestine
  • Pamela Manning, Cambridge Palestine Solidarity Campaign
  • Shoomi Chowdhury, Ipswich and Suffolk Muslim Council
  • Global Citizens (GC)
  • Grass Roots Muslim Movement
  • Angus Geddes, Portsmouth & South Downs Palestine Solidarity Campaign
  • Caroline Day, Tower Hamlets Jenin Friendship Association
  • Richard Hering - visionOntv
  • Sue Owen, Chesterfield Pro-peace/PSC
  • Naeem Malik West Midlands Palestine Solidarity Campaign 
  • Dr. Sue Blackwell (Sainsbury’s shareholder)
  • brighton and Hove PSC
  • Revolutionary Socialism in the 21st Century (rs21.org.uk)
  • Azfar Shafi, University of Birmingham Students for Justice in Palestine society
  • Dr mohamed Ali, NHS
  • Paddy O’Keeffe, Brighton Stop the War
  • Ben Maloney - Secretary, Enfield Southgate Labour Party
  • Tim Holmes, Public Interest Research Centre
  • Igor Strapko, Clapton Ultras
  • Rachel O’Brien, Community Action Officer at University of Birmingham Guild of Students
  • John Tymon, Football Against Apartheid

faces-for-equality:

Trans people are everywhere.

crewdlydrawn:

allthingslinguistic:

hyperboreanhapocanthosaurus:

So you know what I don’t get? Why people repeat words. (x)

Grammar time: it’s called “contrastive reduplication,” and it’s a form of intensification that is relatively common. Finnish does a very similar thing, and others use near-reduplication (rhyme-based) to intensify, like Hungarian (pici ‘tiny’, ici-pici ‘very tiny’).

Even the typologically-distant group of Bantu languages utilize reduplication in a strikingly similar fashion with nouns: Kinande oku-gulu ‘leg’, oku-gulu-gulu ‘a REAL leg’ (Downing 2001, includes more with verbal reduplication as well).

I suppose the difficult aspect of English reduplication is not through this particular type, but the fact that it utilizes many other types of reduplication: baby talk (choo-choo, no-no), rhyming (teeny-weeny, super-duper), and the ever-famous “shm” reduplication: fancy-schmancy (a way of denying the claim that something is fancy).

screams my professor was trying to find an example of reduplication so the next class he came back and said “I FOUND REDUPLICATION IN ENGLISH” and then he said “Milk milk” and everyone was just “what?” and he said “you know when you go to a coffee shop and they ask if you want soy milk and you say ‘no i want milk milk’” and everyone just had this collective sigh of understanding.

Another name for this particular construction is contrastive focus reduplication, and there’s a famous linguistics paper about it which is commonly known as the Salad Salad Paper. You know, because if you want to make it clear that you’re not talking about pasta salad or potato salad, you might call it “salad salad”. The repetition indicates that you’re intending the most prototypical meaning of the word, like green salad or cow’s milk, even though other things can be considered types of salad or milk. 

Can I make love to this post?… Is that a thing that’s possible?

ivoryathena:

Badass women of the future:

  1. Malavath Poorna, the youngest person ever to reach Mount Everest’s summit at the age of 13 years, 11 months
  2. Ann Makosinksi, Canadian inventor of a flashlight powered strictly by body heat at age 16

  3. Mo’Ne Davis, first girl to throw a Little League World Series shutout in history, with fastballs reaching speeds of up to 70mph, at age 13

  4. Alia Sabur, youngest university professor in the world, appointed to Konkuk University in South Korea at age 18

  5. Asia Newson, owning and operating a candle sales business alongside her father, is Detroit’s youngest entrepreneur at age 10

samanticshift:

chasewoods:

The Events in Ferguson will one day make a great movie for white people to feel guilty about and give an academy award to

and the story will revolve around a white journalist who ultimately realizes that wow, we’re all human